Photoset

thejohnsu:

The Law of Equivalent Exchange

(via quillery)

Photoset


Photos of famous landmarks while they were still under construction.

(Source: yourackdisciprine, via jimmy-nd)

Photo
erinkyan:

prettysickart:

emmisnotshortforemma:

Every day… 

I have to share the awesome app I use to negate this issue!
it’s called Medisafe and it’s a free app available in the app store or on google play and it allows you to input all your medications and:
-choose the shape, color, and dosage of each medication (including indicating if it’s an injection or a pill or an inhaler)-notate the dosage and/or # of pills-each time of day/night it needs to be taken-add food or other special instructions-schedule refill reminders-add a med-friend (someone who will be notified if you forget to take it!)
The interface is great and i’ve found it very easy to use.  You can also add meds to take “as needed” so you can indicate that you’ve taken an out-of-time painkiller or booster pill etc.
When it’s time to take your pills it uses the text-notifcation noise on your phone to alert you- so it’s lowkey, but (usually) unmissable.  When it’s time, you have the option to snooze, dismiss, or take pills.  OR you can just shake your phone to indicate that you’ve taken them (I usually either snooze or shake the phone).
It tracks your progress too and you can export yourself an excel spreadsheet of your pill taking to give your physician etc if needed.
You can set the snooze time manually, the maximum number of alarms, all kinds of things- you can set your own alert sound too if you don’t want it to use your text-notification.
.
I am TERRRRRRRIBLE about remembering pills (seriously, I forgot for 3 weeks).  I haven’t missed a dose since I started using it and it’s fantastic.

S I G N A L B O O S T
I know a lot of folk have trouble with this so this could be super helpful!

erinkyan:

prettysickart:

emmisnotshortforemma:

Every day… 

I have to share the awesome app I use to negate this issue!

it’s called Medisafe and it’s a free app available in the app store or on google play and it allows you to input all your medications and:

-choose the shape, color, and dosage of each medication (including indicating if it’s an injection or a pill or an inhaler)
-notate the dosage and/or # of pills
-each time of day/night it needs to be taken
-add food or other special instructions
-schedule refill reminders
-add a med-friend (someone who will be notified if you forget to take it!)

The interface is great and i’ve found it very easy to use.  You can also add meds to take “as needed” so you can indicate that you’ve taken an out-of-time painkiller or booster pill etc.

When it’s time to take your pills it uses the text-notifcation noise on your phone to alert you- so it’s lowkey, but (usually) unmissable.  When it’s time, you have the option to snooze, dismiss, or take pills.  OR you can just shake your phone to indicate that you’ve taken them (I usually either snooze or shake the phone).

It tracks your progress too and you can export yourself an excel spreadsheet of your pill taking to give your physician etc if needed.

You can set the snooze time manually, the maximum number of alarms, all kinds of things- you can set your own alert sound too if you don’t want it to use your text-notification.

.

I am TERRRRRRRIBLE about remembering pills (seriously, I forgot for 3 weeks).  I haven’t missed a dose since I started using it and it’s fantastic.

S I G N A L B O O S T

I know a lot of folk have trouble with this so this could be super helpful!

(via kittycatalyst)

Photoset

not-pizza:

valeart2595:

There are wonderful people in this world…it’s just really hard to find them

I think I’ll notice them when they’re wearing costumes

(Source: pleatedjeans, via jimmy-nd)

Photo
Photoset

littlefroggies:

Marker and Texture brushes available on Gumroad

I finally remembered to export, zip and upload my marker and texture brushes, as people kept asking me to.

I’ve also decided to start the price for all my more time-consumingly hand-drawn brushes at $5. All of the brush tips/shapes for the Texture brushes were hand drawn for each brush.

The marker brushes could also pass for ink wash or just textures, depending on how they’re used. I’m not sure how they’ll look with other pens/tablets with different sensitivity settings than mine (mine is always set towards firm). I decided to keep the marker ones cheap, because I do not feel they’re that unique — I’ve seen many brushes just like them, I just tweaked these using manga studio default assets (plus hand-drawn textures for the dry brushes) to make them work how I like. Your mileage may vary.

Photo
cklookshuman:

made a sad shirt for my wife.
Photoset

fuckyeahdiomedes:

queencorazon:

When you’re in a pinch, just call for the men in tights! (We’re butch.)

[ get to know me meme | (5/5) favourite movies | Robin Hood: Men in Tights ]

(via kittycatalyst)

Photoset

safeword:

garden-hoe21:

dinosaurryuzaki:

lasupremadictadura:

truebluemeandyou:

DIY How to Dress Your Shape Infographic from IGIGI.

this is so awesome because usually the model for the type is super skinny but this I can actually use God bless.

This is also super great because the three main body types focused on in stuff like this are triangle, hourglass, and figure 8. It’s nice to see examples of my body type for a change.

reblogging for the type of language they use

AMAZING

(via kittycatalyst)

Photo
alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

(via beardedkomedy)